Which Children are Left Behind?

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) recently released the annual school report cards for all Wisconsin public school districts and individual schools.  DPI’s press release proclaimed that,

Most schools and school districts meet or exceed expectations on annual report cards.

While that is certainly good news, if we care about our most vulnerable students, it is worth examining whether they are meeting or exceeding expectations.  When these report cards first came out a couple of years ago, I wrote a short piece on the performance of Madison East High School, where my son is now a senior.  I kept it short, because the report cards were new, and those were their first release, but given my penchant for insisting on school district accountability for the education of their students, it is worth examining how well the Madison Metropolitan School District  (MMSD) succeeded in educating its most vulnerable students during the 2013-14 school year.

While overall DPI considered that MMSD “meets expectations,” a closer examination of vulnerable student populations suggests that many MMSD students are not receiving an education which will prepare them adequately for adulthood.

READING

  • Statewide advanced or proficient=37.6%
  • MMSD district-wide advanced or proficient=37.8%
  • MMSD Black students: only 12.9% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 58.2% minimal performance
  • MMSD Hispanic students: only 15.6% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 52.2% minimal performance
  • MMSD students with disabilities: only 14.5% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 65.4% minimal performance
  • MMSD economically disadvantaged students: only 13.5% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 55.9% minimal performance
  • MMSD limited English proficiency students: only 12.9% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 54.7% minimal performance

MATH

  • Statewide advanced or proficient=50.2%
  • MMSD district-wide advanced or proficient=45.5%
  • MMSD Black students: only 16.8% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 47.6% minimal performance
  • MMSD Hispanic students: only 23% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 32.4% minimal performance
  • MMSD students with disabilities: only 19% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 55.6% minimal performance
  • MMSD economically disadvantaged students: only 19.9% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 39.8% minimal performance
  • MMSD limited English proficiency students: only 23.5% advanced or proficient, and a disturbing 32.3% minimal performance

4 YEAR GRADUATION RATES

  • MMSD’s district-wide graduation rate=77.3% (up 2.7% from prior year)
  • MMSD black student graduation rate=59% (up 4% from prior year)
  • MMSD Hispanic student graduation rate=68.8% (up 5.6% from prior year)
  • MMSD students with disabilities graduation rate=44.9% (down 1.3% from prior year)
  • MMSD economically disadvantaged students graduation rate=56.2% (up .8% from prior year)
  • MMSD limited English proficiency students graduation rate=59% (down 3% from prior year)

In sum, while some MMSD students are showing improvements in their reading and math, as well as graduation, too many vulnerable students are either falling ever further behind.  Both the school district and the citizenry must demand more than incremental improvement and certainly no further slippage in performance from our school district.

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For more information on how I can help you accomplish progressive, effective systems change, contact Jeff Spitzer-Resnick by visiting his web site: Systems Change Consulting.

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