Productive Refugees

Our President wants to build a wall on the Mexican border and exclude refugees from countries that he deems terror prone. He claims he is protecting American jobs and our security. Those claims simply do not stand up to any serious scrutiny.

Although refugees and immigrants come from all around the world, currently, the most contentious group of refugees come from Syria. Fortunately, there is good data which demonstrates how productive Syrian immigrants have been after arriving in the United States.

According to the Center for American Progress:

Syrian immigrants earn good wages, with high levels of educational attainment.

The median annual wage for Syrian immigrants in the United States is $52,000. That is well above the $36,000 median wage for immigrants overall and higher even than the $45,000 median wage for U.S.-born workers.

Syrian immigrants are in general very well-educated, with Syrian immigrant men especially likely to have not only a college degree but also an advanced degree such as a master’s, doctorate, or professional degree. Twenty-seven percent of Syrian immigrant men hold an advanced degree, while for other groups—men and women, U.S.-born people and immigrants—the range is between 10 percent and 13 percent.

Syrian immigrants have among the highest rates of business ownership.

Syrian immigrants have extremely high rates of business ownership. Immigrants are, in general, an entrepreneurial group: 4 percent of immigrants in the labor force are business owners, compared with 3 percent of U.S.-born people. But both groups are far outstripped by Syrian immigrants, among whom 11 percent are business owners—more than double the rate of immigrants overall and more than triple the rate of U.S. citizens by birth.

Syrian immigrants have thriving businesses. The median earnings of Syrian business owners are $72,000 per year. These businesses provide employment, create jobs, and help spur growth in the local economy.

The kinds of businesses that Syrian immigrants are most likely to own range from medical offices—the most prominent type of business and no doubt part of the reason for high earnings among Syrian business owners—to food services and automobile dealerships.

Syrians integrate into American society over time.

Syrians have high levels of English-speaking ability. Fifty-seven percent of Syrian immigrants who have been in the United States for more than 10 years report that they speak English at least “very well”—a higher rate than for immigrants overall, for whom the rate is 52 percent.

Homeownership rates among Syrian immigrants are similar to those of other immigrant groups, with the percentage almost doubling from 34 percent for those in the United States for 10 years or less to 67 percent for those here for more than 10 years. The home ownership rate for U.S. citizens by birth is 68 percent.

Syrian immigrants become naturalized U.S. citizens at high rates. Among those who have been here for more than 20 years, 91 percent have become U.S. citizens. This is significantly higher than the 71 percent rate for immigrants overall.

My grandparents all immigrated to the United States from Eastern Europe between the 2 World Wars when there was also a high degree of anti-immigrant sentiment. Most of my relatives who did not leave Europe before the Holocaust perished  in it. A few fled east to the Soviet Union.

Nearly 20 years ago, my wife and I had an opportunity to provide direct assistance to immigrants who fled a repressive regime in Uzbekistan. Since both my wife and I were working when our son was born, we needed to arrange for child care. At that time, there had been a wave of Russian immigrants to the United States, including Madison, and my wife thought Jewish Social Services might know of a recent immigrant who would make a good in-home nanny for our son. Fortunately, they did and Flora became Josh’s nanny until he started kindergarten. Flora and her husband Leo (the former cultural minister of Uzbekistan who became the bread baker at Madison’s Whole Foods) became like family members to us. We attended their son’s wedding, and they attended our son’s Bar Mitzvah. About 3 years ago, they decided to retire and move to Florida where they live near Flora’s sister, who also fled Uzbekistan (their brother is still trapped there). We recently had a lovely reunion with them in Florida.

20161224_203535

Flora reunited with my son Josh, and wife Sheryl

Flora, Leo and their children (and now grandchildren) are all now productive American citizens and some of the finest people I know. My family’s life is better because of immigrants like Flora and Leo. America is a better country when we welcome immigrants. Suggestions from the current administration that we should restrict immigration are not only inhumane. They are also counter productive as America’s success story is the story of successful immigrants.

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For more information on how I can help you accomplish effective, progressive systems change contact Jeff Spitzer-Resnick by visiting his website: Systems Change Consulting.

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